Constructing Mayhem: How They Pulled Off the Insane VFX of ‘Deadpool’

It took the collaboration of several studios to pull off this year’s best visual effects.

Too often with recent entries into the superhero canon, it feels like we’re being ruthlessly beaten over the head by CGI effects. This year, Tim Miller’s Deadpool proved the rare exception. Watching the film, the VFX blend seamlessly into the action and go virtually unnoticed. And this wasn’t any accident.

Prior to his big screen debut in February, Miller’s day job had been running the VFX company Blur Studios with his friend and visual supervisor David Stinnett. The award-winning company is responsible for effects in projects ranging from the intergalactic sequences in Avatar, to critically acclaimed game trailers, to the abstract black-on-black opening titles inThe Girl with the Dragon Tattoo. They even worked on a Disney Marvel movie before switching over to Fox, heading up the three-minute prologue sequence that sets the stage for Thor: The Dark World.

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James Cameron’s ‘Avatar’

Miller valued the VFX of production so much that he knew he couldn’t pull it off alone. He brought together an all-star group of visual effects vendors, including Digital Domain (X-Men: Days of Future Past, Speed Racer), Luma Pictures (Guardians of the Galaxy, Ant-Man), Rodeo FX (Game of Thrones, Pacific Rim), Ollin VFX (Her, The Curious Case of Benjamin Button), Image Engine (Jurassic World, Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them), Atomic Fiction (The Walk, Stark Trek: Beyond) and Weta Digital (Batman vs. Superman, The BFG). Each of these vendors was then assigned various responsibilities while Blur Studios acted as the managerial hub. Weta, for example, was responsible for Deadpool’s face, while Atomic Fiction took on the highway chase scene in the beginning.

Thanks to their efforts, our suspension of disbelief is held in check throughout the entire film. We’re never drawn out of the “Merc” with a Mouth’s world due to cheaply produced effects; instead, the ridiculous action sequences somehow seem totally plausible. One such action sequence — arguably the best in the film — is broken down layer by layer in this behind-the-scenes video released by the visual effects studio Atomic Fiction.

 

 

 

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